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Let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, to which indeed you were called to one body; and be thankful.

Col 3:15

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We live in a hyperbaric environment.  Such are the doings of a highly politicized, secular mass communication culture.

Yes, the “news” is instant and almost inescapable.  And, yes – this keeps us ginned-up, on edge – involved in things we have, frankly, no control over on a day to day basis.

We are, to be honest, cranked up and riled by the daily news – a savage murder here, a major government screw-up there, a celebrity meltdown next, then a grotesque dishonesty, and the sprinkling of partisan name-calling and calamity here and there, oddball advocacy and opinions on top of it all.

My point?  We are apt to forfeit the peace of Christ that is our gift as Christians. Yet, we need not be swept up in the confusion, sin, shame, actions of others, foolishness and the anxiety and doubt that others create.

We can be at peace.  Yes, rest in Christ.  Stay in the peace of Christ.  That is your constant, your stability, your present and your future – here and for all time.

Quiet down.  Stay in Christ.  Stay in the stability that is that peace.

Shalom.

I listen to soothing Gregorian chants and sun emerges to fall on a well-moistened landscape after a steady spring rain – a reminder that God is the One Constant and we as mortals can never undo what He has done.

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… God is the Cause and Principle of all things.

Aristotle, in Metaphysics

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We tend to get trapped in today.  The calamities of today narrowed our vision and would have us forget God is eternal … His will is done … and life goes on.

There is plenty of evidence to support this.  I tell you one.

Novodevichy, is one of the most important religious sites in Russia.  There, on the outskirts of Moscow, a nunnery existed for many years.  In the period when Communist Russia was most hostile to religion it fell into disrepair until a Mother Serafina (a former scientist and grand-daughter of a Tsarist general turned Orthodox priest who was secretly consecrated an archbishop during the Stalinist purges and was subsequently killed by the state) took her religious vows as an aging widow breathed new life into the monastery at Novodevichy.

In five short years, Mother Serafina breathed new life and prosperity into this old monastery.  Women collected at this place, faith was restored and a discarded property flourished with farm, craft shops, restored worship center and quiet holy places for respite and prayer.  What was dying came to life.

Too often we think that the crisis of today, derails the God of everyday.  ‘Tis not true.  Stay in faith and of good cheer.  Our God outlasts all things – is before all things, is present to all things, lives forever beyond all things.

Shalom.

 

Judaism is a theology of the common deed, of the trivialities of life, dealing not so much with the training for the exceptional as with the management of the trivial.

Abraham Joshua Heschel, in Man Is Not Alone

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Rabbi Heschel offers us a simple and powerful observation.  In what he says is this: he reminds us that our faith makes the small deeds of each day holy.  Yes, each breath is sacred.

This point of view gives us a divine and eternal contact in the simplest things – those things done quietly, things often unnoticed – taken for granted.

I see the implicit holiness of my grandchildren in their being itself.  Jack, at two years five months, and Fiona at six months.  She beams her smile instantly and often and looks at the world in wide-open eyes – seemingly happy with all she sees.  Jack bubbles with excitement and joy.  If you wish to see his cowboy boots or his green toy tractor or his Teddy Bear – he runs full speed to his room and back so he might share his belongings and himself with you.  Joyful Jack – full speed ahead.

Yes, we are designed to make the everyday holy.  You see it in children so very clearly. Let them remind us of our innate holiness so we might remind others of their sacredness.

In all things glorify God.  In the quiet of this certainty, life gains its meaning and its immutable, everlasting value.

Shalom.

Surgery was a success.  Total knee replacement.  No pain killers needed.  In rehab – things going well.  Learned I have strong bones and a high pain threshold.  Interesting.

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” … the god of this world has blinded the minds of the unbelievers, to keep them from seeing the light of the gospel, of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God.

2 Cor 4:4

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Last Monday while in the hospital awaiting a late morning surgery, I was asked several times by nurses if I had fasted as required and each time I was asked when I last ate or drank anything, and I replied “6:50 p.m. on Sunday.”

Just prior to surgery the anaesthetist asked me that same questions.  My response did not vary.

However my friend Marty who drove me to the hospital added, “He had Communion this morning.”  The doctor turned sort of pale.  “When?” he asked.  “About 6 a.m.,” was the reply.  “We have to reschedule to a later time today,” said the Doctor.

I apologized for the inconvenience.  I felt embarrassed.  I felt like an idiot for not thinking of the Communion offering as “food.”  A few hours of humbling silence followed.  I thought, I am a lawyer, how could I not see that issue?

In those hours of waiting I realized that years ago I would have seen the Communion offering as simply a wheat product.  But not now, not now as I routinely live … and believe.

My blindness to wheat was actually a proclamation of the sight of belief that I had acquired … quitely, earnestly over years of my conversion to Catholicism and my many, many days of attending Mass, and all that I experienced in the Mass, in my life and in my faith.

My faith had blossomed.  My sight had replaced the blindness that is of this world.

It is so very funny, strange, special how God delivers us and when He does.

How grateful I am for the sight I have been given.  I was blind and now I see!

Shalom.

‘Man shall not live on bread alone, but in every word the proceeds out of the mouth of God.’

Mt 4:4

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This is the response of Jesus to the first desert temptation of Satan.  The word more important than bread.

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.

This, of course, is the opening line in the Gospel of John.  It asks us: to what do you give primacy?  To money?  Power?  Politics?  Yourself?  Celebrity?  Your sexual desires?  Drugs?  Alcohol?  Food?

Food?  Yes, is obesity not a sign of self-deprivation?  Self-consumption? Emotional starvation, and spiritual suffering?  Would not God fill us to satisfaction so much better than food can?  Does Jesus not so very clearly say this?

There is nothing wrong in American society that cannot be radically altered for the better if God and the Word of God is not given primacy to each of us, and to this nation and its culture.  Nothing.

The Toltec Mexican writer Don Miguel Ruiz, Jr. reminds us that in our head two entities reside: one is a parasite and the other is an ally.  Each speaks to us.

The parasite is the one who reminds us of the negative things others have said about us or done to us – the words and deeds which would have us think negatively of our self, impose on us the sense that we are deficient, less worthy. The ally offers, in contrast, thoughts that we are valuable and that voice comes to us from the voices and deeds of those who have seen our value.

Don Ruiz reminds us that we must dismiss the parasite and listen to the ally, but more to the point he reminds us that “neither voice represents your whole Authentic Self” for you are not your thoughts …

In our Christian tradition, its story and its truth: you are an extension of the Word of God, a child of the Master – a word in God’s vocabulary.

There is NOTHING in you, or this nation and its culture, that cannot be corrected by simply placing God at the center of our being – the defining reality of our life, this nation and its culture … and of life itself.

Ignore the many among us who speak as godless parasites.

Shalom.

For those who face a trial and complain or become resentful.

… do not be surprised at the fiery ordeal among you, which comes upon you for your testing … to the degree that you share the suffering of Christ …

1 Pet 4:12, 13

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How often have I heard someone say: why is this happening to me?  Why am I suffering?

In what are rarer instances, I have witnessed in my life those who have faced hard challenges and yet never complained.  I think of my mother: struggling to find work, alone – having lost her parents when she was still a young lady.  And I think of my young wife with cancer, a punishing disease that worsened year by year. Neither complained.

I am asked from time to time, was your mother faithful?  I answer: “yes, by the way she lived – she encountered hardship and never wavered.”  The same could be said of my wife. They each possessed a courage that tells of faith, that comes from faith, that rests on faith.

They believed.  They saw God in the trials, and they walked with God without complaint, or doubt and they never felt sorry for themselves.  Indeed, they put others first.

In our trials we draw closer to God and learn to rely on God not on our self.  We learn that we are not alone and that life is but a passing.  In this we see who we are and what a human being is and can be.  We see how those who do not believe are in constant turmoil and how they cause problems for themselves and others – how discontented they are.

To believe in the midst of a trial is to be a witness to others of the Truth that gives us peace: we are God’s children and we are never alone or forgotten.

Have faith.  Act accordingly.

Ask yourself – does this culture promote or disparage faith and the experience of God?

Have faith.  Act accordingly.

Shalom.

… that they may all be one; even as You, Father, are in me and I in You, that they may also be in Us …

Jn: 17:21

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” … that they may all be one … “

We often think we must find God, as if God is hiding somewhere or is distant and far from us.  But does God require our search?  What if God is nearer than we are to ourselves?

What if God is in “the all?”  What if the Creator is in “all” that is created – in the visible and invisible, in us and without us – in all time, without absence or pause?

In Jesus words, he is saying that we can be one with God, in God as The Son is in the Father.  Does this not suggest an “allness,” a divine inclusiveness?

In Eastern religions, the human is thought to be able to go beyond all ignorance, fear and change to a stable state in which “All things are Buddha,” the Divine is known and experienced in “all things are without self.”  Yes, where we dissolve into the One that Jesus speaks of in the above words.

Imagine this simple thought: If God makes all, is God not in all, is God not All? And from this, we might ask: Are we not in God and is God not in us?  And this: Is our search necessary?

If we are in God as the Son is in the Father and the Father in the Son, would we not change in a drastic and fundamental way how we lived, thought, interacted, spoke?  Would we listen to the godless and uninformed?  Would we pursue matters of discord or division? Would we experience loneliness?  Despair?  Or would we not live in calm, with a quiet inside, softness in our voice?   Would we ever lack for intimacy?

Finding God in All.  Think about it.

Shalom.

MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL!!!

The Son of God became a child, so we might become the Children of God.

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Last night I had a dream.  It was disconcerting, the kind of dream you have now and again of being stuck by facts, circumstances, errors and misunderstandings in a spot where others might hold you liable for the fate of another.

In the dream, my penalty was to be blamed for the demise of an evil person who, in the dream, I was expected to defend in trial – carrying out my duties as a lawyer.

The actions of the Court somehow proceeded without me and the man, indeed an evil individual, was convicted and his associates were to exact a serious punishment from me.

Facing death, they encircled me and cut into a vein in my arm and one in my hand.  I felt no pain and was resigned to accept my fate and my end.

With the second puncture, I awoke and at that inevitable cusp between dream and consciousness I knew it was Christmas and that I belonged to Christ.  At that exact moment, pain, death, injustice and the calamity that becomes the world was conquered because it was Christmas and I belonged to Christ.

Merry Christmas to all!!!

Shalom.

… the first Christian hermits abandoned the cities of the pagan world to live in solitude.

Thomas Merton, in The Wisdom of the Desert

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Why does a man live alone in nature, removed from the population and the city?

‘Tis a useful question.

As for the 4th century men who did so we can say, as Merton does, that they sought their salvation, saw its individual characteristic and their own responsibility for its solicitation.

Indeed, they saw that the pagan society that they knew offered little to further their salvation.  Rather, they concluded that it impeded access to it.

These men would not let the ways and values of the pagan culture destroy them, co-opt them.

They took no comfort in the Cross becoming part of the presiding temporal powers.  This, itself, is particularly interesting.  They seemed to know that civil matters where not spiritual in nature, that to The Divine alone belongs the primacy.

Think for a moment: these men saw Christian life as spiritual, as “extramundane” – as simply existing in the Mystical Body of Christ … and they saw that their responsibility was to seek life in Christ.

These men stood for the idea that man was personally responsible for his life and what it said of him and of God.  

Contrast that with today – when so many are captured by the common denominators of secular culture, its herd, its folly, its untruth and its destructive, conflictive and unsatisfying ways.

These men did not wish to be ruled by the decadence.  They did not see themselves, mind you, as superior to others but rather only more intent on living in accord with their faith. They lived socially in aid of one another and strangers as governed by their faith and “the charismatic authority of wisdom, experience and love.”  They “sought … their own true self, in Christ.”

Today I live on a ridge looking out on rolling pastures, forest, and mountains. Minutes ago the sun rose in the East over mountain peaks announcing once again that God reigns eternally …

Each sunrise – unique in its colors and hues – raises up God the Creator … enkindles my gratitude.

In my solitude, quiet makes the music so much sweeter and evocative.  In the solitude, I think of God in a daily silence, and meet the Desert Fathers.  In solitude, I have good company.

Shalom.

“today’s longing for any, even the most illusory, certainty …”

“The question tortures today many people: how does one believe … “

“The only thing to be regretted without qualification is for man to be perfectly adapted to totalitarian society … Hence we should all be sick in some way.  We should all feel despair …”

Czeslaw Milosz, in his letters to Thomas Merton

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A longing for certainty.  The very capacity to believe.  Totalitarian despair.

Milosz, living in Communist occupied Poland identifies some of what a large number of Americans experience today, and his words help explain the fundamental divide in our society and the nihilism that accompanies today’s popular culture.

As to certainty, the only certainty we possess is hope, and that comes from faith.  Yet, faith is under attack, dismissed by our elites, academics, “entertainers,” media, politicians, judges, bureaucrats, and others.

Yes, religion, a cornerstone of America, is dismissed by those who have dominated culture, commerce and national governance.

Belief.  Without religion, there is no belief.  The starting point for believing arises in and from religious experience.  Without belief, there is despair.  Without religion, totalitarians prosper and despair and its consequences thicken as death lays hold in many, premature and violent forms.

This is our present snapshot.  This is the recent electoral result.  This is England leaving the European Union and Solidarity chasing the Communists from Poland.

Certainty.  Hope.  Faith.  Religion.  Believing.  Freedom.  The desire for these produced the rejection of those at the top of popular cultural, political power, commerce and finance, in the media, in entertainment.

We have seen this statement in the recent election: “No” to the totalitarian conformity of political “correctness” and its indoctrination.  The root of this rejection is a thirst for hope and the certainty of belief, for independence, dignity, purpose and meaning, for moral order and freedom to be as God made us to be.

The godless always overplay their hand and engage childish fits when their unearned comfort is disturbed.

Shalom.

Addendum – Barack Obama says “history” will be Castro’s final judge. Wrong again, Sir.  God does the final judging.

This pretty much tells you all you need to know about the Left and modern liberalism and the wayward places their thinking gets you when they are in power. 

Thinking of history as our judge, not God, is so Leftist, so material, so temporal, so small, so narrow, and so hopeless.  Out, out dark spot!

And how about Hillary and Co. joining the “recount” brigade!  Trump holds out an olive branch of “no more investigation” and true to form Hillary takes the branch and claims the tree and all the land coast to coast that it stands on.  Liberals never could spell “grateful.”  A jackass is the perfect symbol for these people.

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