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The existence of evil is not so much an obstacle to faith in God as a proof of God’s existence, a challenge to turn towards that in which love triumphs over hatred, union over division, and eternal life over death.  (Emphasis added.)

Nicholas Berdyaev, in Dreams and Reality

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Who among us thinks counter-intuitively?   You?

In a mass secularized culture, if you are not careful your thinking and life experience will be altered in a fundamental way that will strip you of what you and those before you knew and by which you were shaped and well-informed.

Yes, in a short time – secularization has altered the human experience as we once knew it … and we are the worse for this.  Life itself has lost its sacred nature, its joy and meaning.  Such turns make it easier to divide us and see innocent, defenseless babies as the object of our violence and destructive of them.

Who among us can see this as good, justifiable?  Have we not seen such action in the extermination camps of the 1930’s and 1940’s?

Shalom.

 

 

… every abominable thing that the Lord hates they have done … for they even burn their sons and daughters in the fire …

Deut 12:31

Abortion should be listed as a weapon of mass destruction against the voiceless.

E.A. Bucchaineri

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Well New York Governor Cuomo signed into law a bill that approves abortion up to and including the day a woman is to give or is giving birth to a child.

Try to deny that this is not returning to child sacrifice.  Try to tell me this is merely a “choice.” Try to convince me that this ought to be lawful?  Is humane?  Justified?

Think about this: in the ancient pre-Christian world child sacrifice was not uncommon.  Think about this, too: we now have Leftists in the Congress who attack Christianity, desire to exclude God or any reference to God from the public square or any public gathering.  Think about this as well: in a culture where contraceptive means are reality available women have come to use abortion as contraception.

Finally, what could be going through the mind of a Governor who would think that abortion performed on a child about to be born is acceptable, moral, a good idea or defensible?

Democratic members of the New York state legislature stood and applauded upon hearing that the Governor signed this bill into law.  So much for the Democrat Party – the pro-infanticide political party.

A child is not something to be owed to one, but is a gift.  The “supreme gift of marriage,” is a human person … the child possesses genuine rights … “the right to be respected as a person from the moment of conception.”  (Emphasis added.)

Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2378

Shalom.

In the Celtic tradition many stories tell of the warrior or hero who goes off to battle but, before leaving, begets a son.  The hero dies and so the son is born with no father and this is regarded as a Virgin Birth.

Joseph Campbell, in Thou Art That

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In the history of human story over the Ages, the idea of a Virgin Birth is rather common and it linkage is with the quest of the child (often a male child) who must seek his identity as a man and find his spiritual father.

James Joyce in Ulysses has Stephen Dedalus in search to find his spiritual father – the one who gives him his character.

Seeking one’s father is so common a literary event, is it not odd that this presents itself almost not at all in a secular culture whereby many children, and many male children, are born without a father in residence, even born to an unknown or absent father?

I, of course, ask this to point out that we are ignorant of a common human motif and the very critical quest that is presented to a boy who does not know his father.  Likewise, I add this – we talk of Virgin Birth as largely a scientific non-starter … something that cannot be reasoned … as if reason is the source of all truth and understanding.  Odd isn’t it.  This the narrow scope of those who received an “education” such as it limits present.

A boy without a father faces a significant hurdle.  I was such a boy.  My father walked by me when I was a small child and never said “hi.”  He played no greater part in my life.  From him I learned that those who do not love you, do not love you … and that I was largely on my own, left (as I did) to protect my mother and learn from life and the good men and women around me – what it is to be a man.

In the context of this quest – I acquired considerable understandings – many subtle and nuanced – but all trans-generational and trans-cultural truths … In this context I was all eyes – watching and learning.  In this context I learned how to defend myself and others and be aggressive when I needed to be … I saw more clearly the fit between men and women and our indispensable need for one another, and the unique and heroic nature of both men and women.  I learned that two are stronger than one … and that we all have a Spiritual Father.

Shame on us for not seeing the common search of one’s father and the cost imposed by a father who flees his responsibilities, and for damage done by women who make “men” the cause of all that they feel has been wrongly done to them.  Shame on us for not seeing that the violence of fatherless children has a great deal to do with our ignorance as to one’s desire to know who he is and to have a rite of passage to adulthood and an honorable fatherhood.

Is not Christ’s birth one such as our’s and given to us as a guide, a gift, a necessity?

Shalom.

 

Back from an unexpected day without a post.  It was a leisurely drive back from family and friends – a long road in beautiful country and heavenly quiet.

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The version of eros that Jane Austen’s novels study … is hardly animalistic.  It is ethicalthat is, it is concerned with the education of the will to the end of good character, and indeed is precisely about coming to know someone’s character.

Deirdre N. McCloskey, in The Bourgeois Virtues

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Who among us acts as if love is intended to deliver us to good character

To the best of my knowledge I give you my answer – not very many.  And I add we are a sick culture – more animal than human.  Grunts in heat – far short of character … the kind of people you’d be best to avoid.

McCloskey’s book is excellent and particularly good in discussing love and its relationship with our character.

Only through McCloskey can I see clearly the distinction between my wife who died childless of cancer at 29 (one month short of our 4th anniversary) and a subsequent wife who left a child, a husband and a marriage after 22 years for no particular reason but her desire to do so.

In McCloskey’s work I see so clearly one spouse aligned love and character and one did not.  I add, indeed, that unbeknownst to me in dedicating my life to the care of my seriously ill and dying wife – I had enkindled in me the relationship between love and character.

I add thankfully that by the grace of God I lived and loved in a manner that both life and love was joined to the quest for good character – who I am, who I have been made at birth to be.

Recognizing this allows me to see so clearly the blessings of that first love and the triumph that my life has been – all because of the grace of God.  Likewise, I see the ugly character of so many in our culture who make no such linkage between love and character.

It is hideous how the affluent and so-called “elites” and public figures, celebrities and the self-proclaimed wisdom figures and endless talking heads show absolutely nothing to distinguish them nor merit any of our attention.  Yea, their personal lives often a mess –  a series of failed marriages – seemingly without a touch of honor.

The fault lines are now between the urban and suburban elites and those who are not them.  Oddly, the fault lines might just be between those who show that love is connected with character and those that do not.

Shalom.

 

Our birth is an invitation to our gifts, a call to immersion in the Absolute, with the possibility of our ultimate transformation through contact with the Divine.  (Emphasis added.)

Wayne Teasdale, in A Monk in the World

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Think for a moment.  Our birth a sacred offering, a call to God and our God-given gifts.  Our birth as the opportunity to be subsumed by God.

Our birth is the ultimate and only way to our full development from physical being to a whole human –  spiritually, psychologically, emotionally, socially, intellectually, and morally  … and to a complete life, one of context and contentment, of peace, understanding and tranquility.

What do we do with this gift?  Abort it before a child’s birth?  Could there be no greater proclamation of our fallen state than to kill an unborn child and fight for the opportunity to do so?  Could there be any greater rejection of God and the sacred gift of life that aborting an unborn child?

Think about what this says of contemporary American life.  Can this be who we wish to be?  Does this not denigrate women and their extraordinary sacred call to carry life within them?

Knowing women to be so special and so critical to men, and children, and family, and morality, and faith, and decency, and this country – I cannot imagine this is what any women would wish to be known by.

God help us all.

Shalom.

Thumping.  The behavior of the Democrats in the last few days suggest that think they may get a trumping – that is, do far short of what they touted they would.  The Blue Wave might be an ocean spray.  Politics.  Strange business.  Lots of propaganda paraded out as truth.  Ummmm … No wonder people are skeptical.

 

Then they set out along the black top in the gunmetal light, shuffling through the ash, each the other’s world entire.

Cormac McCarthy, in The Road

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McCarthy writes of a father and his most beloved son who walk under the grayest of skies in a burned out and broken America.  It is both a compelling book and extraordinary movie.  In both I am struck by the love of the father for the son and the son for the father, and by the grayness of the sky amid the ruin.  The latter reminds me of the verbal and video landscape of the present days where hostility is thick as fog and division seems the only objective of the public voices we hear and where each day brings stories of death, cruelty, hatred and the commentaries of the C- and D+ scribes and talking heads whose range of thought is a tad lower than that of a carnival barker.

In a most extraordinary land darkness has descended.  What was once one is now fragmented into many bruised parts .

He could not construct for the child’s pleasure the world he’d lost without constructing the loss as well and he thought perhaps the child had known this better than he.  He tried to remember the dream but could not.  All that was left was the feeling of it … he could not enkindle in the heart of the child what was his own ashes.

This father like me had lived a dream – a dream in better times.  I was conceived when the Second World War was near its triumphant end.  My childhood was spent on a street of veterans and their families – remarkable men and women whose childhood commenced in the Great Depression and turned then to World War – its millions dead, others murdered in Stalin’s gulag.

How does one speak of what we had and lost?  How does one make that the known experience of an adult son?  Give him the optimism purpose and meaning I, poor as we were, knew so well?

How do my grandson or my granddaughter gain what had been, but now is so damaged?  How can my ashes live to sign their forehead?

The Road.  Where this father and son had the dark shadow and penetrating cold of a dying orb – they at least had silence.  We have the unstoppable voices and words of those whose lips bring darkness and cold.  They are now our dismal cover.

“You have to carry the fire … It’s inside you.  It always was there.  I can see it.”

So says the father to the son.  So say I to you, this day.

Shalom.

News as Soap Opera – This is where we are in a superficial mass communication, digitized social media culture.  We interview people with no achievement or proclaim and, in doing so, cannot distinguish people of substance from people who have no particular accomplishment.  We are more soap opera than not.  We can no longer tell the difference between depth and shallow, or what is substantive and what is not.  A real astonishing decline.

Some Pharisees came up to Jesus, testing Him, and began to question Him whether it was lawful for a man to divorce his wife.  He … said, “What did Moses command you?”  They said, “Moses permitted a man to write a certificate of divorce and send her away.”  Jesus said … “Because of the hardness of your heart he wrote you this commandment.  But from the beginning of creation, God made male and female. For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and the two shall no longer be two, but one flesh.”

Mk 10: 2-8

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Divorces have become common.  In the terms of the above words from Jesus – they are evidence of “hardness of heart.”

How casually we divorce!  If one wanted to see a concrete sign of our faithlessness one need only think of the divorces we have seen, the motivations of the moving party and the injuries they so easily inflict on children and the spouse who is being divorced.

Hardness of heart.  What a dreadful identification for a person to hold.

I know a man whose wife filed for divorce without any assertion of cause represented by the man’s behavior.  Her reason for divorce: their child was off to college and she felt “their work was done.”  Of course, it might be noted that her two closest girlfriends maintained adulterous relationships with wealthy men who they eventually married.  Behind the scene, of course, was this – the woman wanted to find a man with money.  She, in due time, married a wealthy man – no thought about the effects on her child or her former spouse.  I suppose that qualifies for a hardened heart.

Let’s be brutally honest – as a culture we are closer to hardness of heart than to God.  And, yet we wring our hands and wonder: what is wrong with this country?

Yes, we are what is wrong – we blow-up families, crave material things, pledge words that are easily broken.  Yep, we excuse all sorts of dreadful behavior.  Shame on us!

Shalom.

 

 

 

The important lesson that the family taught was the existence of the only unbreakable bond … between human beings.

The decomposition of this is surely America’s most urgent social problem.

Allan Bloom, in The Closing of the American Mind

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Imagine what might happen if people began to examine public policy at the national and state level from this perspective: what does this policy do to promote intact families?

Asking that one question, I suspect, would raise real doubts about our public policies.  Indeed, I bet if that became a threshold question – the negative effects of policy on family would lead to abandonment of a very significant number of government activities that have produced harm rather than good.

It seems to be we do little to fortify the family.  Take divorce for example – most states entertain “no fault” divorce.  Want a divorce?  No problem.  Divide a child from his father?  No problem.

Think about the present subsidy going to single, unmarried women with children who continue to have more children with other men.  How does this help anyone?  The children?  The women?  The men who fathered these children?  A community?  A city?  A state?  A nation?  The family?

Ironically, divorce lawyers seem untainted by what they do … I’ve not met one that wonders what effect divorce has on this society.

Those who advanced the “sexual revolution” rarely seem to be asked what effect they have had on family, on children, women and men?  On intimacy?  On human dignity and maturity, responsibility, virtue, honor, loyalty, fidelity?

In sum, I guess I am somewhat astonished that we never seem to examine what we do in vital areas and the public course we set even though we see injury and disarray among American families – so fundamental to our health, peace and prosperity.

Shalom.

 

In Memory of My Mother

To the mother alone is given, that her soul during the nine months should touch the soul of the child, and impose upon it predispositions to truth, gentleness, goodness.

Jean Baptiste Lacordaire

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There is no way to overstate the role of a mother in a child’s life and the life of a nation. Yes, to her is given the sacred disposition of soul touching soul.

One can judge a nation by its mothers and its children … and by the manner in which men protect mothers, children and nation.

That said, what can one say of our nation and its abortions, promiscuity, unwed mothers, children without fathers … about a land where sex “trafficking” is present as is child abuse?

What can we say about an elite class where the powerful and notable have exploited women?  Abused them?  Assaulted them?  Where adultery is commonplace and the  female body is preyed upon?  Where fewer men stand tall and strong in defense of the innocent, and of women and children … and where the sexes are divided for political purposes?

Too often in our culture I see that women are mistreated.  Just today I read a story of four adult immigrant men who drugged and sexually assaulted a poor 15-year-old run-away girl over a four day period of abduction.  The men were participants in sex “trafficking.”

I am grateful my mother and grandmother, my aunts and great aunts, and wife Sylvia are not alive to see this.

If we care about mothers and the sacred place of women in human existence, we’d best change radically the way we function as to women and girls.  No more assaults, no more rapes, no more exploitation – stronger punishments, speedy trials, fast-track appeals, quicker convictions, longer jail terms, fewer prison comforts.

Men: protect women and children, your neighbors, the elderly, the weak and in-firmed.  Live with honor.

Shalom.

 

Like every other human being, I am a splinter of the infinite deity … If the human [soul] is anything, it must be of unimaginable complexity … the only equivalent of the universe within is the universe without … as I reach this world through the medium of the body, so I reach that world through the medium of the psyche.

Carl Jung, M.D., in Memories, Dreams and Reflections

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Jung in describing the psyche is also conveying to us the nature of human health and wholeness whereby one lives not merely through the body but (and more critically) through the psyche as well.   Indeed, for Jung and other psychiatrists and learned people – a person is far from well (and prone to sickness and disorder) who lives within the body alone.

Looking about America in this age and time it is quite obvious that we are awash in disorder.  The social pathology is visible daily in news stories.  A state governor, despite being married, has a bizarre public sexual romp with his staff person, a man and woman beat their four year old child to death for spilling soup, a caretaker places a child in an oven to punish her … And the list goes on and on …

Are we not the only country that seeks tax revenue from drug use?  And look at the failure of custodial authorities (schools, social workers, police, teachers, principals) to attend to the obvious sickness and danger that Dylan Cruz plainly displayed and the pathetic social policies associated with that failure (the suppression of data on criminal conduct in Broward schools by the creation of “deversionary placements” so as NOT to have to face school violence done by “minority students” and the police officers unwilling to enter the building during the shooting for fear of running afoul of those who govern policy).

Let’s be honest – we live in a disordered culture, one in decline with manifestations of mental illness that simply go unacknowledged – denied, disguised, normalized or hidden.

In Jung’s words – we deny we are “a splinter of the infinite deity” and in that we starve the soul and ignore the psyche – the nexus between the world within and the world without (that which recognizes a mortal existence that is housed within eternal reality).

Yes, we are very poorly evolved and hence psychological problems, injuries and death abound.

We see these problems starkly in the ideas and actions of the political Left.  Indeed, having the lunatic Left present and active is like we are in foster care of Sarah and Cheryl Hart (the two lesbian mothers and “mates”) who drove their SUV off a California cliff into the Pacific Ocean 100 feet below with six helpless foster care (Black) children in the vehicle and to their collective death.

Any honest comment on American life, culture and society today must begin with an understanding that there is a great deal of mental illness that is unaddressed, dressed up as “normal,” excused, and tolerated despite the brutal costs that it imposes on others and the population at large.

We have drifted a long way from health and happiness and the decline is accelerating at a compounding rate.

That said, I offer you the words of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, S.J. –

In the shadow of death may we not look back to the past, but seek in utter darkness the dawn of God.

Shalom.

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