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You wake up in this here world, my sweet li’l mister, you got to wake up tough.  You go out that front door tough for a morning’ and you stay tough ’til lights out.

Daniell Woodrell, in The Death of Sweet Mister

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You wanna’ know how Trump worked the North Korea deal?  Toughness.  Toughness in language.  Toughness in the New York City real estate business.  Toughness in his Queens childhood.  Toughness in the streets.

You don’t get toughness in the privileged class.  They value the soft life where nobody starves and nobody gets killed.

Expecting the privileged to wrestle a guy loose from his missles is expectation misplaced.  Yale and Harvard Law ain’t the the bloody streets.  Ain’t fist fights and flying F-U’s.  They don’t teach toughness there.  Those guys ain’t missing any teeth.

Think about it – that last crew in the WH had to pay Iran billions and never derailed ’em from their nuclear dreams.  The privileged think one pays for peace … Ya right!  Those are the kids that pay the school yard bully not to hit them.  Pathetic.  Paying a bully says: “fear,” “weakness,” “push-over” – breeds their disrespect of you – – – makes it all the more dangerous a place to be alive.

Lesson No. 1 – don’t expect the privileged to fight for you.  ‘Taint never happening.  Never.  Too soft, too much to lose.  The status quo keeps them on top as the danger grows.  Now you know why globalism is globalism.

The last WH crew didn’t never have a fight.  Didn’t never face down the Murphy Twins who loved to go at you two on one for no particular reason.  The last crew didn’t live a street war between the McLaughlins and the guys in your neighborhood.  The last crew didn’t live in “public housing” with its asphalt and treelessness.

When you think about toughness – you realize too many here are too soft.  You realize that there is a basic fault line between the guy in the street, people living in small towns where the factory closed and the money left – and the folks in Washington – those in authority and in the permanent bureaucracy … that difference: tough versus soft.

In the world as it is and always has been – you’d better be tough or you get your lunch eaten and your money taken.

Shalom.

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Often our mistakes provided the greatest lessons, humbled us, and enabled us to grow and become better.  For leaders, the humility to admit and own mistakes and develop a plan to overcome them is essential …

Leaders must always operate with the understanding that they are part of something greater than themselves and their own personal interests.

Jocko Willink and Leif Babin, in Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy Seals Lead and Win

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These two combat-experienced Navy Seal officers have something important to share with us and they do in their co-authored book Extreme Ownership.

As to the above: there is a direct relationship between humility and leadership and between both humility and leadership and the recognition that we are created as part of something far greater than us – something that exceeds our personal interests.

Yes, we are part of the human family and called into life by a loving God and into an existence that tells a far greater story than our own life might ever tell.  We are, at best, part of the story and, when at our most faithful best, likely a sign or message or source of encouragement for others (some of whom may merely observe us as from afar).

And the authors give us this: mistakes often provide the greatest lessons – but to learn from mistakes one must “own” those mistakes (hence, the book title “Extreme Ownership”).

Easier to say this than to see it done in the world at large.  Just look at the present F.B.I., the Justice Department, the intelligence services and those who are in positions of authority or the last Presidential administration – an awful lot of “covering” one’s tracks – dodging responsibility for things done, said or not said.  The “take away” lesson to be learned and adhered to: there is NO leadership without humility and the capacity to own what went wrong.  

Indeed, you know those in authority are not leaders when truth is not told and gross failures are never discussed or “owned.”  I think of Benghazi, for example – a shameful mess that cost good men their lives.

If humility is essential to leadership then God is too for the human person is born with neither humility nor patience but that life and a belief in God makes it so.

Shalom.

 

 

 

 

 

In so far as man himself, consecrated by God’s name and dedicated to God, dies to the world that he may live for God, he is a sacrifice.

St. Augustine, in The City Of God

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Is it for the world that you live?  For yourself?  The goods of the world?  Its comforts?  Titles?  Wealth?  Esteem?

Or do you live a life that is first and foremost consecrated to God?

The men, the heroes of wars past and present – those who themselves volunteer to serve at risk of injury, disability or death – they are the ones consecrated to God. They are the living sacrifice.

God bless them.

May they be our guide.  Our inspiration.  Our models.  May they flourish in number among us.  May our sons and grandsons know them and live in their honor.

We give thanks for them – the living and the dead.

We stand forever grateful.

Shalom.

The hero is one who lives in the inward sphere of things, in the True, Divine, Eternal, which exists there … His life is a piece of the everlasting heart of nature itself.

Thomas Carlyle, in Lectures on Heroes.

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Heroism, like life itself, is lived from the inside out.  The hero’s deeds are divine and state this truth “no greater love hath one that he lays down his life for another.”

Let’s face facts.  Carlyle is talking about the place of the Divine in the acts of heroes much as I have written often that one’s life cannot approach excellence without a relationship with God.  Apropos, and as I have written so often, a culture without God is ruled by darkness – seen so easily day after day in the chaos and disorder of so many – living so close to one another – to us … and memorialized in the daily news.

When I see the public figures and talking heads on television each day – I do not see heroes … on the contrary I see sickness, disorder and chatter which signifies that those who chirp on and on have no clue that they put their failure on display.

Memorial Day Weekend – think about heroes.  Are you disposed to be in the right form and manner of your sacred being?

Shalom.

Stay Safe this Memorial Day

The Master said, “To see what is right and not do it, is want of courage.”

Confucius, in Analects

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I have noticed in my lifetime that courage is easier to find in the common man than in men with status, wealth, privilege and estate.

Likewise I am stunned by the lack of courage among my fellow lawyers.  Many prefer picking “low-hanging” fruit at high billable hours than “a fight.”  It follows far too often that a client pays “through the roof” only to find their lawyer avoids conflict.

Perhaps valor is simply suited for the common man whose life inevitably is hard, has risk, brings him evidence of injustice which MUST be addressed directly and immediately.

I conclude: some fight, most take flight.

Think about this (consider it Bobby’s Rule): when one sees evil but does nothing he or she makes life harder for others for they pass along a troubled person who (when he or she is not challenged in place) simply moves on to others to wreak havoc until finally someone fights back.

Who are you?  The one who lacks courage?  Or the one who confronts the wrongdoer and in doing so – does his or her sacred duty.

Courage, people!  To lack it is to be a disgrace.

Shalom.

Postscript – Confucius speaks this truth in the 5th century before Christ.

And Mary said, “Behold the handmade of the Lord; be it done unto me according to thy word.”

Lk 1:38

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If Christ’s life is a guide to us, one might ask what does his conception tell us?

That, of course, puts the focus on Mary and tells us something very significant about women and, consequently, about our need to have full regard for them which warrants our reverence of them.

Contrast, if you will, Mary with Eve.

Mary’s faithfulness breeds humble obedience.  Her love of God provides her consent to her call to holiness.  Compare this with Eve who disobeys God’s instruction in Eden.  One might think of the two as showing us the difference between acts resting in one’s ego (Eve) and conduct arising in one whose faith has led her to knowledge of her True Self (Mary).

Yes, faith lived in one, matures the person – allows the certainty, comfort and courage of one who knows himself or herself as God’s beloved child.  This: a good lesson for all  … especially for men to whom it ought to be a very important understanding that prompts and promotes our love and protection of women per se and of our mothers and sisters in particular.

In a way, Mary in her response also rehabilitates Eve – redeems her disobedience.

Mary’s importance to us – to men, and to men and women, is an extraordinary lesson that we often (in the secular culture so highly charged with sexuality and gender division and confusion) forget, ignore or deny.

One might say, quite fairly, that the feminists have done more damage than good in ignoring Mary – the most significant woman in human history.  Yes, many troubles flow from such willful ignorance.

One never profits when one’s focus is on mere earthly status at the expense of what is eternal (the ego at the expense of the True Self); for there is no value in mortality absence eternity.  We ignore Mary at great, great cost.  How foolish we are!

We must change our ways.

Shalom.

Another School Shooting – This time in Santa Fe, Texas.  Ten dead, others wounded.  A sole shooter.  A high school student – described by his classmates as quiet, shy, nice and the brunt of some ridicule – somewhat of a loner.

And so the same questions begin: guns or no guns, how to protect the students and teachers?

When will we ever begin to see the cause of these events?

Let’s face it – life in a highly secularized culture that exiles God from it has minimal intimacy  … little basis for caring about more than self – hence lots of grotesque narcissism – top to bottom.  And let’s also acknowledge that the Left (feminists included) breed antagonism and division – ditto those who (sadly) see all others as divided by race –  despite the huge efforts made in stamping out once “legal and institutional” racism.

Truth is the Left functions by dividing people one from another, group from group as if we are NOT all Americans, men or women, God’s children, afforded equality under the law  – or least until Ms. Hillary was excused from her misdeeds while Mr. Trump was set upon by those who wish to fashion for him a crime he did not commit.

And let’s not forget abortion and the level of callousness that these deaths establish, in the millions, since abortion was made (and shamefully so) “legal.”

A secular society hostile to faith as this one is – is society that does not articulate the value of life – but rather takes actions after actions to prove just the opposite – that life as we now live is not sacred, valuable, to be cherished and embraced.

The cause?  Those who proceed to institute policies and advocate foolishness without any regard for the existence of God.  Pathetic.

From Mary’s obedience to our treacherous rebellion!  A disgrace.

In Memory of My Mother

To the mother alone is given, that her soul during the nine months should touch the soul of the child, and impose upon it predispositions to truth, gentleness, goodness.

Jean Baptiste Lacordaire

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There is no way to overstate the role of a mother in a child’s life and the life of a nation. Yes, to her is given the sacred disposition of soul touching soul.

One can judge a nation by its mothers and its children … and by the manner in which men protect mothers, children and nation.

That said, what can one say of our nation and its abortions, promiscuity, unwed mothers, children without fathers … about a land where sex “trafficking” is present as is child abuse?

What can we say about an elite class where the powerful and notable have exploited women?  Abused them?  Assaulted them?  Where adultery is commonplace and the  female body is preyed upon?  Where fewer men stand tall and strong in defense of the innocent, and of women and children … and where the sexes are divided for political purposes?

Too often in our culture I see that women are mistreated.  Just today I read a story of four adult immigrant men who drugged and sexually assaulted a poor 15-year-old run-away girl over a four day period of abduction.  The men were participants in sex “trafficking.”

I am grateful my mother and grandmother, my aunts and great aunts, and wife Sylvia are not alive to see this.

If we care about mothers and the sacred place of women in human existence, we’d best change radically the way we function as to women and girls.  No more assaults, no more rapes, no more exploitation – stronger punishments, speedy trials, fast-track appeals, quicker convictions, longer jail terms, fewer prison comforts.

Men: protect women and children, your neighbors, the elderly, the weak and in-firmed.  Live with honor.

Shalom.

 

“… the guys I couldn’t save … “

” … we take care of each other.”

Chris Kyle, in American Sniper

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These words come into play near the end of the movie American Sniper.  They arise in an exchange between the distinguished Navy Seal Chris Kyle and a doctor who is talking to Chris about the effects that sustained combat tours might have had on Chris.

These are the words attributed to Chris in that exchange.

When asked about the things he saw in his four tours of duty in Iraq (approximately 1000 days as suggested by the doctor) – Chris says he is not concerned with the killing he engaged because he was protecting his guys – but rather he is concerned about the guys he couldn’t save.  And he explains that we take care of each other.

What if we in this country cared about protecting one another and caring for one another and acted accordingly? 

What if we cared so much that we would routinely risk our life to protect others and to care for each other?

Quite honestly this would be a very different country.  Indeed, it is hard to envision the range of bad behavior we see and tolerate today if we lived to protect and care for others.  Likewise, it seems that fear would dissipate … crime would diminished.

But you know the most interesting aspect of this proposition is this: what do you suppose the effect might be on men like Chris Kyle in a self-serving culture when he is one of only a few with such courage, with a willingness to sacrifice and care for others more than self as he did?

Imagine what it would be like for you if you were the guy who cared for others as he did, who sacrificed for others while the vast majority of population went about serving their own needs to the exclusion of others – and doing so day after day, month after month, year after year.

What might the man or woman feel who sacrificed all his or her life and put others first, defended and fought for others in a society where many felt obliged to serve self first, exclusively and endlessly?

Imagine if we lived in a society with only a few like Chris Kyle.

Shalom.

 

 

If we want to be anything other than what God has made us to be, we are wasting our time.  It will not work.    The greatest accomplishment in life is to be what we are, which is God’s idea of what he wanted us to be when he brought us into being; and no ideas of ours will ever change it.  Accepting that gift is accepting God’s will for us, and in its acceptance lies the path to growth and happiness.

Thomas Keating, in The Heart of the World

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The above is a foundational truth.  It is what leads to a good and satisfying life.

If you have an “education” or a profession, a title, status, a job that yields a high income and you do not understand the above, you are likely to do more harm than good to yourself and others and be perpetually discontented, or problematic, or wrong, or unlikable or all four of these things and worse.

We have a whole lot of people in the public eye who have no clue what a good and happy existence is or how one might live a good and joyful life.

Look at the political world, the celebrity world, the news and media industry, the big names in technology and finance – mostly unpleasant, prideful and over-rated.

Be who we were made to be.  Do what you are made to do.  Be you – God’s humble son or daughter.  Peace, comfort and confidence follow.

Shalom.

 

… I’ve brought a big bat, I’m ready you see.

Now my troubles are going to have troubles with me.

Dr. Seuss

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I often encounter people who have legitimate concerns about those who make it their business to drive a hard Left agenda.  In some instances the concerned party wonders out loud what can be done to forestall these arrogant people and their destructive ideas.

I offer this: SPEAK up – confront them, be prepared to tell them why they are wrong and what damage and division they cause.  Put them down each and every time they act like they know best and push their views on you.

You see, you can’t let people with little to offer but large egos and bad ideas think they are entitled to force their views and plans on the rest of us, or this great country at the expense of our religious beliefs, morality, interests, intelligence, personal dignity and autonomy.

Yes, tell them to “button it up.” Recommend they take a long walk of a short pier.

We are far too cordial and too nice and civil with people and groups who attempt to impose their ideas on us.

A little of Dr. Seuss might do you well.  Give it a try.  Stand tall and make it clear that you will not be a compliant target of views which are injurious, wrong or destructive.  Case in point, President Trump didn’t get the North Korean’s attention by acting like the apologizing Mr. Obama.

“Tolerance” is not evidenced by silent compliance.  There is no freedom in being bullied into a position by a vocal minority.  Civility abandoned is best cured when it becomes clear that one’s dignity and freedom will not be thwarted in the course of public discourse.  Isn’t that the point of Dr. Seuss’ clever words?

Shalom.

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