You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Jesus’ category.

“Judas, are you betraying the Son of Man with a kiss.”

Lk 22:48

+ + +

We don’t often think of betrayal and investigate it very thoroughly.  Yet, it is a rather common human experience.

The Wall Street Journal offered an article (“Four Days of Rain in the City of Naples,” November 11-12, 2017) about the re-publication of a book entitled Malacqua written by Nicola Pugliese and published to great acclaim in 1977.  The article gets to the issue of betrayal – to its scope and what it says about the human person and respect for one’s clearly stated preferences – and being.

The book told the story of “Naples beset by a biblical deluge” and some mystical events that accompanied the destruction brought on by the rain.

The book was a remarkable success, yet shortly after it was published its author refused to allow further publication and retreated to the countryside and lived a reclusive life until his death.  After his death, it was republished.  Pugliese’s wishes were dismissed – he was betrayed.

It seems that Pugliese’s act of withdrawing the book from publication was a statement of his deeply held “revulsion” of society.  In his escape to anonymity, the author was saying “I’ve had enough.  I’m out of here.  Please leave me alone.”  In his silence, he bothered no one.

My point?  Even after death one can be betrayed.  We are a strange species.

How we fail to honor others – even in their simplest yet profound expressions of who they are.  Life sure is interesting.

Shalom.

 

Advertisements

Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they shall be satisfied.

Matt 5:6

+ + +

So speaks Jesus.

My son and I have wonderful conversations about life and living in this land at this time.  The conversations have among their themes seeking truth – wondering how it is that the culture and many in leadership positions or in positions of influence (as in the media) seem uninterested in truth and what is right and good.

A good life is oriented to seek truth.  Ones who seek truth are, in a real sense, seeking the Divine – that is with man but rises above man.  Yes, seeking the Eternal and Everlasting – seeking God.

The desire for good, for what is right – is planted within.  Its expression is a natural thing – a good itself, a reassuring sign that one seeks properly, that one seeks what is meaningful and meaning itself.

For what do you seek?  Do you seek what is false and cannot satisfy?  Look at those whose life is chaos – they seek not for what is good.

What does the culture hold out as worthy of our attention?  Status?  Celebrity?  Wealth?  Influence?  Power?  Beauty?  Pleasure?

Be smart.  See clearly that secular culture seeks these things mentioned.  But it does not seek righteousness … it does not seek God.

Remember: nothing but Truth satisfies.  That is: nothing but God satisfies – as God is Truth.  What do you seek?

Shalom.

 

 

… the fact remains that for Christianity, a religion of the Word, the understanding of the statements which embody God’s revelation of himself remains a primary concern.  Christian experience is a fruit of this understanding, a development of it, a deepening of it.  (Emphasis added.)

Thomas Merton, in Thomas Merton on Zen

+ + +

Merton, like others, stressed the importance of acquiring the Christian experience – the full integration of Christ into one’s life.  That is, not merely treating Christian existence as the acquisition of a system of truths about God, or an explanation of how the universe came into being or how it might end.  Nor did he think that the Christian experience was meant to explain the purpose of Christian life or a set of moral norms per se.

He saw the Christian experience as more – more than “a world view,” or “a religious philosophy” sustained by a cult of believers, or a moral discipline, or a code of Law.  No, he saw the Christian experience as “a living … experience of the presence of God in the world and in mankind through the mystery of Christ.”

Yes, the integration of the reality of God’s existence through the mystery of Christ in one’s mortal life in this world.

Indeed the Christian experience is nothing less than the daily – moment to moment understanding that God is with us, in companionship, through the mystery of the gift of Christ.

Imagine, if you will, what one’s life and each breath can be like if this is the cornerstone of your human experience.  Surely if men and women acted on the strength of the Christian experience, all that is sordid, treacherous, hateful, etc. would pass from view or at the least be less present in the world.

In this coming new year, think about this.  An integrated Christian life is offered to you.

Shalom.

The mistake that you make … is thinking one can live in a corrupt society without being corrupt oneself.

George Orwell

+ + +

A glance at the condition of the Justice Department’s handling of the Clinton investigation or the current Special Counsel’s activities might give just pause to think about Orwell’s statement.

Likewise the past administration’s suspension of drug interdiction that allowed Middle East terrorists to smuggle drugs into our country so as to placate the Iranians and preserve the dubious agreement to further Iran’s nuclear program also prompts reflection on Orwell’s proposition.  Ditto, “Fast and Furious” whereby the Justice Department gave guns to Mexican drug gang members that eventually were used to kill an American law enforcement officer.  And then there is the IRS targeting conservative organizations and forestalling their applications for tax exempt status might also cause some soul-searching as to Orwell’s comment.

Think about where we are today in this culture.  Think about the daily drumbeat designed to discredit a duly elected President because one either doesn’t fancy him, or because one is “offended” that their candidate did not win, or because he does not fit the Washington-way where everyone participates in a privileged event for “insiders” – members of the governing-club, the Skull and Bones of politics.

You know when you attend church this Holy Season and kneel to pray, I wonder if you’ll think of today’s events and how they might implicate those who remain silent.

When you hear “Silent Night” sung, I wonder if you might ask yourself: Am I to remain silent today?

Shalom.

Stumbling, Bumbling, Fumbling – That’s your Federal government – that’s the GSA’s (General Services Administration) handing over private emails belonging to private citizens to Special Counsel Mueller who had no legal approval to seize these emails.

It seems Mr. Mueller and others know less about ethics and law than required. It is the Gang that can’t shoot straight looking for the Gang that can’t shoot straight – when all they need to do is to look in the mirror.

Wonder why people have no confidence in the Department of Justice,  the FBI, the Special Counsel and government at large?  They see what they see.

Remember it takes only one clown to make a circus.  Seems we have more on hand than required.

Affection is responsible for nine-tenths of whatever solid and durable happiness there is in our natural lives.

C. S. Lewis, in The Four Lives

+ + +

We are made to seek contentment, to love and be loved.  In this one fact alone is evidence of God and the essence of our sacred being, itself.   Yet, today there are piles of evidence that we are neither content, nor seemingly loving or sufficiently loved.

“Evidence?” you ask.  Yes.

Look around.  See how few intact families there are.  See the divorces.  The adulteries.  The overt expressions of selfishness and hatred.  How we have elevated sexuality and exploited the human body.  Look at the predators and those who remained silent while knowing of their assaults, their habitual abuse.  Look, too, at pornography. The sexual abuse of children.  Abortion.  Parents killing their children. The addictions.  The “normalizing” of abhorrent conduct – the fiction of “same-sex marriages,” the lunacy of multiple genders.  And the grotesque violence.  All a product of the desperately unloved.

Now contrast these things with the God who is Love.

We live in a time when God is forsaken and destruction is advanced as a substitute.  We make Sodom look tame.

Many like to point to a President as the cause of our serious problems.  Others expect “politics” or government to be the source of our health, contentment – salvation.

No, these cannot satisfy.

Our happiness resides with us, with who we are – and with the recognition that God is necessary and the source of all that is good in us, good in human existence and in this mortal world.

It is Christmas time.  The source of your happiness is born this month.  Wake up!

Shalom.

The Kingdom of Heaven is like a landowner who went out early in the morning to hire workers for his vineyard …

Mt: 20:1

+ + +

So begins the parable of a landowner who hires workers in the morning and adds several more workers at several different times during the day paying all the workers the same wage despite the hours each worked (some worked more hours than others but all received the same wage).

Remember the beginning of the parable … “The Kingdom of Heaven is like … ”

Jesus is telling us that the Kingdom of Heaven does not conform to human, mortal, earthly expectations.  So much for the common whining that “X or Y isn’t fair.”  

Think how many times you hear someone complain about something being unfair.  Think as well about the efforts the self-designated “aggrieved” seek to twist and turn rules and regulations, create “compensatory” programs to achieve “fairness.”

All this: the clanging of a bell in the wind … Their erroneous predicate: this world is the measure – this world matters, all must be “right” by their standards in this world.

How in the name of God can anyone operate in this world thinking (despite all evidence to the contrary) that imperfect humans can create a delicate balance of exacting justice?

What evidence does one offer to support this view?  How does such evidence explain the Kingdom which is described above?

The point, of course, is that God levies the justice and fairness that God wishes to levy.  We, Dear Friends, are NOT in control of divine measure.  We are mortals at best and, frankly, selfish and corrupted on an average day.

Do you need any proof of this today?  Just look at the widespread corruption on the political Left – the Clintons and the Democratic National Committee paying for fake intelligence reports on Donald Trump, Comey’s antics, the political use of the IRS and the Justice Department under Mr. Obama …

We are far from what is just and good … yet, many among us (like the Left) seek to impose their view of “fairness” on us.  Really … Doctor, heal thyself.

Humility, Friends.  Humility.  We ain’t that good and we sure ain’t “pure.”

Shalom.

I don’t know how the kind of faith required of a Christian … in the 20th century can be at all if it is not grounded on (the) experience … of unbelief.  (Emphasis added.)

Flannery O’Connor, in a Letter of May 30, 1962

+ + +

We have had a difficult time understanding what provoked Stephen Paddock to kill defenseless people at a Las Vegas outdoor country music concert.  Mr. Paddock’s action has been lost to law enforcement, public officials, media mavens, security experts and the mental health community.  But the truth is it is not that difficult to explain or understand.

Flannery O’Connor gives us the answer: we live in a treacherous age of unbelief.  It is a treacherous time in which God has been exiled.  Ms. O’Connor reminds us that without God life has no meaning.

Mr. Paddock’s brother, from whom he was estranged, said Stephen Paddock had “no politics, no religion.”  We know that Mr. Paddock had two short failed marriages, that he was a CPA – bright, good with numbers – yet, a loner with seemingly no close friends or neighbors who have come forward to tell us who he was.  He was a successful gambler, not a joiner.

Loner, smart, wealthy, no religion, no close relationships: a godless life – one without belief.  This a barren existence – a daily suffering.

One has to enter the depth of relationships to experience love, to find meaning in life – to see the animation of God in self and others.  Mr. Paddock was largely estranged from others, even his brother with whom he had prior business relationships.  Without God such estrangement is murderous and suicidal.

Mr. Paddock’s strength was his intellect but intellect narrows existence – in itself, it keeps the person in the head while starving the heart and soul.  Nothing promotes unbelief like the exclusive emphasis on intellect.  (Does this not explain a great deal about the failure of the education system and the educated class, their disposition and ideas – and their trusted tutors and favored ideologues.)

An exclusively intellectual life sterilizes life; it kills feeling and intimacy while isolating one from others.

In a purely intellectual life that neglects God and social, emotional and spiritual growth – one cannot see the divine image in others.  Mr. Paddock acted from that base – that was the genesis of his motivation and his mass murders and suicide.  Over-intellectualized, unbelief, personal under-development, isolated asocial existence were the seeds that took root in Mr. Paddock and produced his ethos and his final life-ending acts.

That said, the lesson for us must be this: we are so out of touch with the critical role of religious belief in contemporary life that we have created estrangement that kills and destroys in many forms – daily in this land … and we cannot even name it when we see it and suffer its consequences.

Forget all the “isms” – we have a greater problem in this land.

Finally, the answers to riddles often are conveyed in the facts offered.  In the Las Vegas killings innocent people were attending to the music of America, country music, with its stories of hard work, marriage, family, the land, faith, small children and small towns, first loves and love lost, hardship and reconciliation – these were Mr. Paddock’s target.  He made that which he did not have his targets.

Yes, a man without these intimate things confessed his godless alienation in this heinous massacre. 

Time to wake up – and get serious about what we have created and what we excuse and tolerate.  We are not the people we have been made to be.

“I do believe; help my unbelief.”  (Mk 9:24)

Shalom.

Please share this post with others if you wish.  Restoring belief is very important.

 

 

 

All human nature vigorously resists grace because grace changes us and change is painful. (Emphasis added.)

Flannery O’Connor, in a Letter of December 9, 1958

+ + +

We are willful.  We prefer our ways to the ways of He who made us. This one thing accounts for our disorder, and eventually to a demise.  It is for each of us the single challenge in our life.

Done well life is a process of submission to God.  Yes, we grow when we decline so He might gain. In shorter the shadow we cast, the greater we are – the healthier we become, the more certain and the calmer we are.

Look around you.  We now have organizations that work to advance selfishness, sin – one preferred method of rebellion and godlessness or another … and we have many who co-exist with those who advocate disorder and sickness.  The enablers can sink this culture, jeopardize our health and wellbeing.

The tug-of-war between good and evil is a consistent part of the human story from the beginning of time.  Flannery O’Connor reminds us in this December 1958 letter that God does not miraculously meddle in each and every human affair, rather He offers the grace to grow, mature, come to faith and meaning through life experience, the sacraments, belief, worship.  In grace we grow in dignity and our implicit responsibility is to defend and preserve the sacred value of life itself.  Yes, this may put us at odds with others … but is it not Jesus who asked: “Who is my mother and who are my brothers?” (Mt 12:48)

To reject grace is to reject God and life itself.

Look about.  Do you see bad being called “good?”  This is the condition of our time, and the ageless challenge: good or evil – life or death, God or His adversary?

Shalom.   

 

Difficult subject.  I have tweaked this several times in the hopes of not alienating others while trying to focus on restoring some good to our present circumstances.

# # #

The psychology of the individual can never be exhaustively explained from himself  alone: … clear recognition is needed by the way (one) is also conditioned by historical and environmental circumstances … individual psychology is not merely a physiological, biological, or personal problem: it is also a contemporary problem. (Emphasis added.) 

Carl Jung, M.D. in “Psychological Types” (Collected Works, Vol. 6)

+ + +

Mass murder in Las Vegas.

Disorder does not spring up by itself no more than a flower blossoms without a seed.

The individual person does not (even in the best of times) possess much self-understanding.  In our mass communication culture, where God and religious belief is minimized or attacked, disorder is magnified.  Today we seem intent on division and antagonism.  Political correctness is not a moral structure.

When “isms” proliferate disordered conduct can displace healthy and trusted beliefs.    Those in authority can even advance chaos.

An individual’s disorder is conditioned by history, personal environment and culture – all the more when faith is lost and society has gone astray.

Evil seems to flourish when antagonism is more common.  We pay a very heavy price for division and godlessness.

It is a time to draw together, to seek what we share in common, to build friendships and foster individual responsibility so each might know prosperity and the contentment of personal achievement. 

It takes discretion and determination to avoid disorder today.  Only those with considerable self-understanding maintain a healthy distance.  Religious narrative and a relationship with God are critical today.

You had best see who you are and what precisely your culture conveys … and most certainly turn away from those who advance disorder.  Destruction is the obvious product of disordered people.  We need to get well.  To listen carefully and choose wisely.

The healthy person today will be more likely he or she who resembles as to modern society and disordered godless mass culture the disposition of a monk in plain clothes.

Shalom.

If you find this post helpful, please pass it along to others.  Thank you.

Being Reported – It is being reported by several news organizations that a senior attorney at CBS expressed an absence of sympathy for those shot in Las Vegas because “country music fans often are Republicans – (and) gun toters.”  One can only hope this is not accurately reported.  Yet, it is surely the case that political hostility must be reduced by all.

If you took one-tenth the energy you put into complaining and applied it to solving the problem, you’d be surprised by how well things work out.

Randy Pausch, in The Last Lecture

+ + +

I’ve never been a fan of whiners so the well-healed NFL football players, coaches and owners who put their social complaints on the captured audience of ticket-holders and television viewers have lost my interest and respect.  Shame on them.  Nothing admirable about them – nothing.

Just watched Patriots Day about the Boston Marathon Bombing.  Excellent movie.  More than that a terrific story about tough-minded, loving men, women and children who rallied together as one to see that those who killed innocent people were apprehended and punished.  It is a story about courage, toughness, achievement, honor, resolve, determination, individual strength, shared mission, sacrifice, community, love.

I grew up in Boston in a very testy public housing complex.  I know these people.  Many have been my friends for 64 years and more.  They are my family.  They would sacrifice for me and I for them.  Several recently faced tragic medical situations, I kept in touch: encouraging and caring.  I prayed for them and, as is always the case in tragic situations, I drew closer to God and became more thankful for all that we are generously given – especially for friends, neighbors, the capacity to care for others – and love God and others more than self.

Today, I see the legions of complainers in American culture today and am sickened by this – disgusted with them.  I knew a far different life.  I knew the life of taking what you get and moving forward, proving the obstacles non-existent, defying others who thought less of me by being more a person than they were.  I was not a genius but I was a hard worker, determined, tough, a realist who saw the near-empty glass and said: “Damn, I’ll fill the thing and more like it.”

I knew the bigotry that befalls the guy from the “wrong side of the tracks.”  The thoughts others affix to the poor neighbor and its residents.  This was my badge of courage – a badge shared by others in my same situation.  I saw life being raised with one parents and not much money.  I lived that life.  Became the first in my family to go to college.  First to graduate from college, go to law school, become part of a profession.

I became an Army officer.  Went on to graduate school at Johns Hopkins, worked in the U.S. Congress on foreign policy matters, had a successful law practice helping the poor, the sick, the under-represented.  People wrote articles about my work, about me.  I walked my wife through a devastating illness that took her life at age 29.  I left law in my late 50’s to earn a graduate degree in theology at Notre Dame, became a Catholic convert and vowed religious Catholic Brother.  I raised a successful son with his own Ph.D.  By the grace of God, he is a better man than I am – talented, smart, a terrific son, father and husband.  Ya, I was busy … I had no time to whine nor taste for it.  Like those around me, I saw bigotry and said “Screw you, I’ll show you who I am and what I can do.”  Their bigotry was motivation to me.  I didn’t sit on my fanny or make a political statement: I lived and defied those who discounted me and my friends.

At the end of the movie Patriots Day the men and women who participated in the hunt for the hate-filled brothers who killed and maimed children and adults spoke of visiting those wounded and without limbs and made this point: none were bitter – but rather they were optimistic, courageous – ready to strive, to live and prosper.  Yes, working class people I know are – not whiners … they are Boston Tough. 

Damn it, we ought to learn from them.

Shalom.

 

Advertisements

Welcome Message

Categories

Log In

%d bloggers like this: